American flag photo courtesy of Cavell L. Blood via Free Images.

Beware the Return to U.S. Global Leadership

Following a disastrous four years of Trump’s “America First” policy, President-elect Biden’s pledge to restore American power and prestige in the world offers a sense of comfort and relief to many.

Black Lives Matter protest in Washington, D.C. in June 2020. (Photo courtesy of Koshu Kunii on Unsplash).

A Safer World Starts at the Grassroots

If the events of the past year have taught us anything, it’s that America faces a historic moment of reckoning in its relations with the rest of the world.

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force photo/Sgt. J.T. Armstrong)

Nuclear Weapons Profiteers are Driving the Nukes Debate

With a price-tag of more than $1.2 trillion dollars, there’s intense debate about plans to overhaul U.S. nuclear forces. What many don’t realize is that there’s considerable money within this debate, and it’s coming from the very companies that will make billions if the United States upgrades its nuclear forces.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with Chinese President Xi Jingping in Beijing, China in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. State Department on Flickr)

US-China: Confrontation or Cooperation?

Will the political line-up that we see in Washington next January be one that favors greater confrontation with China, or one that seeks to dial back the tensions that have arisen between the two countries in the past few years?

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  1. The Things We Know, But Do Not Say, About the Costs of American War
    by Maj. Danny Sjursen, USA (ret.) / November 17, 2020
  2. A Realistic, Progressive Foreign Policy for the United States
    by Dan Plesch / November 17, 2020
  3. Nuclear Weapons Profiteers are Driving the Nukes Debate
    by Ose Okooboh, Ben Freeman / November 17, 2020

Foreign Policy

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with Chinese President Xi Jingping in Beijing, China in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. State Department on Flickr)

US-China: Confrontation or Cooperation?

Will the political line-up that we see in Washington next January be one that favors greater confrontation with China, or one that seeks to dial back the tensions that have arisen between the two countries in the past few years?

Secretary Tillerson meets with ASEAN Ambassadors to the U.S. in March 2017 (Photo courtesy of U.S. State Department on Flickr)

Renewed Friendship: Deepening Security Ties Between the U.S. and ASEAN

In 2011, President Barack Obama made the security of the Asia-Pacific region “a top priority” for the United States. Nine years later, tensions with China have escalated dramatically. These tensions cast a dark cloud over the future of U.S.-China relations, as well as the national and economic security of both Washington and Beijing.

President Donald J. Trump at the UN General Assembly in September 2018. Photo courtesy of Shealah Craighead via the White House’s Flickr Account

A Realistic, Progressive Foreign Policy for the United States

A progressive international agenda needs to begin with a frank assessment of the present strategic culture and connect domestic and global progressive priorities. Global threats such as climate change and nuclear weapons have not been prioritized, while national treasure is squandered in endless wars.

National Security

American flag photo courtesy of Cavell L. Blood via Free Images.

Beware the Return to U.S. Global Leadership

Following a disastrous four years of Trump’s “America First” policy, President-elect Biden’s pledge to restore American power and prestige in the world offers a sense of comfort and relief to many.

Black Lives Matter protest in Washington, D.C. in June 2020. (Photo courtesy of Koshu Kunii on Unsplash).

A Safer World Starts at the Grassroots

If the events of the past year have taught us anything, it’s that America faces a historic moment of reckoning in its relations with the rest of the world.

War and Peace

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force photo/Sgt. J.T. Armstrong)

Nuclear Weapons Profiteers are Driving the Nukes Debate

With a price-tag of more than $1.2 trillion dollars, there’s intense debate about plans to overhaul U.S. nuclear forces. What many don’t realize is that there’s considerable money within this debate, and it’s coming from the very companies that will make billions if the United States upgrades its nuclear forces.

Climate Justice

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